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Let's start this article with the following statements and a question: I speak two languages because I learned them at school or because I grew up in a country with a different language than my native language, or because my grandparents spoke another language and I grew up with them or because my friend (neighbor, colleague, etc.) is teaching me and we practice every day or because I know how to use a dictionary. Does that make me a translator?


Being a translator is not only about rendering words from one language to another, but it is about knowing the culture, grammar, spelling, and other methods and techniques of translation that are taught in institutes, universities, or other entities that train and certify translators.


Have you ever come across a sign that has no meaning, is funny, has no sense, and is perhaps insulting? If the answer is yes, then it means that a bilingual person translated it, but not a translator. Translators are bilingual or multilingual, but bilingual or multilingual people are not translators.


How can you improve as a translator? Here are eight keys to becoming a successful translator:


1. LEARN ABOUT THE SUBJECTS TO BE TRANSLATED.

Let's say your area of expertise is in the legal field, but you get a business translation document. Although the two have something in common, the language is not the same. You have two options: give the paper to a business translation expert or read a lot. Learn how business language is developed and use the correct terminology. The more informed you are, the easier and smoother the translation. Remember that a dictionary is only a tool (20%), and the rest is you (80%).


2. SPECIALIZE IN AN AREA O CATEGORY

Just as in school, there are courses we are passionate about, and there are others we don't even want to take; the same applies to the field of translation. If you are passionate about medicine, become an expert in medical translation; if you are passionate about law, become a legal translator; if sports are your thing, then become a sports translator; take advantage of your passion for developing as a translator in that field. If you still don't know what type of translation you like best, try experimenting with articles you can find online. This way, you will find the specialization that is right for you.


3. MAKE GOOD USE OF PRINTED OR VIRTUAL DICTIONARIES

There are many language dictionaries and robotic translators that you can find in a bookstore, library, or thrift store, from someone who gave them to you as a gift, and through internet search engines and more. Be very careful with this because not all dictionaries are correct. Before buying a dictionary, research the author, the edition (if it is outdated, you will not find modern terms), and if the dictionary has the localization terms required for the translation. Spanish from Spain is different from Central American Spanish, which in turn is different from South American Spanish. A dictionary will give you the words from the source language to the target language, but you provide the meaning of the translation.


In the dictionary, you will find several meanings for a word, and you will ask yourself which one to use; the answer lies in your experience, knowledge of the subject you are translating, and understanding of the subject. That is why it is necessary to read a lot and soak up the terminologies in the source and target languages.


For example, Auxilio (requesting help) differs from Auxilio (assistance). In legal terminology, Auxilio can refer to the action of an accomplice in a crime; in medical terminology, it can refer to someone's request for help.


4. DON'T TRUST A ROBOTIC TRANSLATOR

Robotic or online translators are very popular today. Some are free and easy to use. For translating simple things, they are perfect. Still, if you have to translate an essential document, it is best to do a translation using the tools, methods, and techniques learned in a translator training institution. As translators, we are responsible for the content of the translation and the precision or accuracy that it is a complete and true translation of the original document. A robotic translator does not offer these translation qualities. Some virtual translators do a good job, such as Trados for freelancers. Still, again it is important to emphasize that your knowledge and experience are the keys to successfully translating a document.


5. PROOFREAD THE TRANSLATED DOCUMENT AT LEAST THREE TIMES AT

DIFFERENT TIMES OF THE DAY.

A translation is like a work of art; our work and effort using tools, techniques, and methods will help us obtain an optimal result.


In my experience as a translator, I have learned to proofread translations at least three times at different times of the day has helped me a lot with the quality of the product. Why? Spending too much time on a single document creates redundancy, and the translator's creativity can become blocked. We can make the mistake of using words that are not appropriate for the paper we are translating. When you find yourself tired or bored of translating the same topic, take a break, read something that has nothing to do with the subject of the translation and when you have removed the blockage from your mind, go back to your translation and this time you will see it differently. You will also notice spelling mistakes that Word's proofreader missed; you will be able to calmly check the grammar of the content and the meaning of the translated subject. That is the reason why experts recommend that translations should be done between two to three days; this time will allow you to review the document at different times or days so that you can find errors (if any), review the sense of the subject, check for accuracy and review the cultural content. Remember: Picasso did not complete his great works of art in one hour.


6. PARTNER WITH OR HIRE A PROOFREADER TO READ YOUR TRANSLATED

DOCUMENTS.

Proofreaders are responsible for correcting style, but they are also in charge of reading and re-reading each paragraph to correct errors. They must check for spelling mistakes (typos) and the syntax and semantics of each sentence, i.e., ensure that it is correctly constructed and that the idea you want to convey is understood.


7. PRACTICE CONSTANTLY COMPARING TEXTS THAT HAVE ALREADY BEEN

PUBLISHED IN THE SOURCE AND TARGET LANGUAGES.

Practice makes perfect. On the Internet, some publications are written in different languages. For example, the Harry Potter book has been translated into more than 70 languages, and the Bible into more than 400 languages. Search for a book of your choice in your native language and look it up in the other language you are fluent in.


Translate chapter by chapter. There you will notice how the words are selected for the intended audience and the localization of the translated text ("flat" => "apartment").


8. CREATE A GLOSSARY OF TERMS THAT DO NOT HAVE A LITERAL OR

CONCEPTUAL TRANSLATION OF A WORD OR PHRASE.

Create a personal glossary with words or sentences that have no literal translation but to which you give meaning according to the context.


For example, "The apple doesn't fall far from the tree" – if we write that phrase in Spanish, it would say, "La manzana no cae muy lejos del arbol"- That analogy does not make sense in Spanish. Its equivalent translation in Spanish would be: "De tal palo, tal astilla." Both phrases mean the same thing but do not have the exact translation.


At Traducy, we are here to help you. If you have questions about our translation services, please call us at 385-977-8713 or email us at contact@traducy.com.

If you would like to get a completely free estimate, visit our website: www.traducy.com

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In Part I of our article, we talked a little bit about ACA and ADA; in this second part, we will speak of Executive Order 13166, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act, and the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS)


EXECUTIVE ORDER 13166

President Bill Clinton signed this order in 2000. This order was to "Improve access to services for Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals."


The Executive Order requires federal agencies to review the services they provide, identify any need for services for LEP persons, and develop and implement a system to deliver those services so that LEP persons can have meaningful access to them.

The Executive Order also requires federal agencies to work to ensure that recipients of federal financial assistance provide meaningful access to their LEP applicants and beneficiaries.


To assist federal agencies in meeting these responsibilities, the U.S. Department of Justice has issued a policy guidance document, " Compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - National Origin Discrimination Against Limited English Proficient Persons." This LEP Guidance sets forth compliance standards that recipients of federal financial assistance must follow to ensure that their programs and activities generally provided in English are accessible to persons with limited English proficiency and, therefore, do not discriminate based on national origin.


TITLE IV OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964

President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964. This law prohibits discrimination in public accommodations by integrating schools and other public facilities and makes discrimination in the workplace illegal.


Concerning Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals, this law requires institutions receiving funds from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to provide an interpreter free of charge to anyone in need of the service.


In other words, it requires recipients of federal financial assistance to take reasonable steps to make their programs, services, and activities accessible to LEP persons, including interpreters and documents translated into the LEP's preferred language. If you need the services of an interpreter, these institutions must provide them free of charge.

Follow this link to see which agencies receive financial assistance from HHS: HHS FUNDS https://taggs.hhs.gov/SearchRecip


Implementation of the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services


THE NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY APPROPRIATE SERVICES (CLAS)

These standards are a way to improve the quality of services provided to all people, which will ultimately help reduce health disparities and achieve health equity.


Chapter III on communication and language assistance stipulates the following:


* Provide language assistance to persons with limited English proficiency (LEP) and other communication needs, at no cost to them, to facilitate timely access to all health care and services.


* Inform all individuals of the availability of language assistance services clearly and in their preferred language, verbally and in writing.


* Ensure the competence of language assistance providers, recognizing that the providers should avoid using untrained persons or minors as interpreters.


* Provide easily understood printed and multimedia materials and signage in the languages commonly used by the populations in the service area.


It means that individuals with limited English proficiency have the right to receive professional interpretation services either in person or virtually and in written form at no cost to the patient, as long as the health care facility receives federal funding (under regulations 4,5,6, and 7).


To read about the standards, click on the link: https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/assets/pdf/checked/spanishexeSum.PDF


At Traducy, qualified interpreters are prepared and ready to help you communicate and break language barriers.


For more information, call us at 385-977-8713 or email us at contact@traducy.com, and for more information about our services, visit our website at www.traducy.com.


Source: justice.gov


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Translating is an art where grammar, spelling, and rhetoric come together to give sense and meaning to a group of words from one language to another.


When we talk about translations, sometimes we think that anyone who knows the source language and the target language can do it, which is partly true, but translating an important document to do paperwork requires experience and knowledge of techniques that only a certified translator knows how to use.


A certified translator is a person who has studied the methods and techniques of translation, as well as the cultures of the source and target language. To obtain a certification qualification, the person must pass an exhaustive examination in which he/she will apply the techniques and methods learned, considering the culture, grammar, and target audience.


In the case of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the translation of documents that are not originally in English is required to be done by a certified translator who certifies that the translation is complete, correct, and competent.


The Code of Federal Regulations, 8CFR 103.2(b)(3), regarding translations, states, "Every document containing a foreign language submitted to USCIS shall be accompanied by a complete English translation that the translator has certified as complete and accurate and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English."


The documents required by USCIS and that need to be translated into English are birth certificates, marriage certificates, divorce certificates, academic degrees, death certificates, passports, bank statements, police records, criminal records, transcripts (schools, colleges, universities), affidavits, and others.


Previously, we had said that USCIS requires the translated documents to be complete, correct, and competent. What does this mean?


1. COMPLETE

It means that no information should be missing from the original document to the English translation. The format of the certified translation must also reflect the original document.


2. CORRECT

This means that all information has been accurately translated. Names, numbers, addresses, and any other information in the original document should be spelled the same in both languages. (If the person's name is Pedro, the name should not be changed to Peter).


3. COMPETENT

USCIS requires the translation to be certified because if the information is found to be incorrect and incomplete, the translator will be held responsible and not you. Furthermore, if USCIS needs clarification on the certified translation, they will contact the translator with the contact information provided on the certification.


IMPORTANT: If you do not submit your documents translated into English by a certified translator with certification of the translation, your case will likely be denied. So be prepared.


At Traducy we have certified translators who provide complete, complete, and competent translation services.


Call us at 385-977-8713 or email us at contact@traducy.com or visit our website: www.traducy.com if you need help or if you would like to get your free quote or estimate.

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